[an error occurred while processing this directive] EES Foster-Hewett Lecture Series
dfh lectures 2010earth & environmental sciences
EES

Schedule, 2010 D. Foster Hewett Seminar
April 8th and 9th

Planetary Geology and Geophysics

maps and directions             past speakers

4:10 pm to 5:00 pm     Thursday, April 8th
Physics Building, Lewis Lab 270 (LL270)
Martha Gilmore,  Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University    (website)
"The oldest rocks on Venus"
7:00 pm to 8:30 pm     Thursday, April 8th
Physics Building, Lewis Lab 270 (LL270)
Sarah Seager,  Earth & Planetary Sciences, M.I.T.    (dept. page)   (website)
Evening keynote and discussion:
"Exoplanets and the search for habitable worlds"
12:10 pm to 1:15 pm     Friday, April 9th
Physics Building, Lewis Lab 270 (LL270)
Caitlin Griffith,  Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona    (website)
"Titan's storms, rain, and seas: familiar processes in a foreign world"
2:10 pm to 3:00 pm     Friday, April 9th
Physics Building, Lewis Lab 270 (LL270)
Bethany Ehlmann,  Geological Sciences, Brown University    (website)
"Aqueous environments during Mars' first billion years: New insights from orbital near-infrared spectroscopy"
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm     Friday, April 9th: Panel Discussion

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The Annual Donnel Foster Hewett Lecture Series is sponsored by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences and is supported by a bequest which was made to the department by one of its most distinguished alumni, Donnel Foster Hewett.

Hewett matriculated at Lehigh University in September 1898. Following graduation in 1902, he spent another year at Lehigh as an assistant in metallurgy and mineralogy under the direction of Joseph Barrell. After Joseph Barrell moved to the Department of Geology at Yale in 1907, Hewett went there in 1909 to study geology and received his Ph.D.

In 1911, he joined the U.S. Geological Survey and his career with the organization spanned 60 years until his death in 1971. When in 1951, Donnel Foster Hewett reached the mandatory retirement age of 70, his full-time employment by the Survey was continued indefinitely by Presidential order. To a great host of geologists, he became a legend in his own time and was affectionately referred to as "Mr. Geological Survey" or "Mr. Manganese", the latter because of his devotion to and advancement of our understanding of the mineralogy and genesis of manganese ores.

During his career he received many honors:

  • Vice President, Geological Society of America in 1935 and 1945
  • President of the Society of Economic Geologists in 1936
  • Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1937 and the Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1949
  • Distinguished Medal of the Department of the Interior in 1951
  • Penrose Medal in 1964
  • Honorary Ph.D. from Lehigh in 1942